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Privacy is no Friend on Facebook

Mark Zuckerberg, Did you miss the class discussing “Privacy” at Harvard?

As you fill your Facebook account with family. friend and new contacts, it is obvious that Privacy is not a word that Facebook cares about or understands. In some recent articles about the cyber hackers “Anonymous” they clained they did not take down Facebook because it’s a great source for the hacking. There’s an endorsment you didn’t hear when the stock was going public.

It was reported yesterday that Facebook wants to allow 13 year olds and under to have accounts. After attending a recent security conference its members rated Facebook as the second most valuable tool for criminals, Google is still #1. So many users still don’t understand personal privacy and what topics are  resonable posts. Kids will talk about their desires that child preditors will use. Teens talk about upcoming vacations that burglers use. Cyber theives develop malware laidened ads and aps that adults download. So if you want to raise your odds of being a vitium of identity theft, having your children harmed and have your house ransacked then keep that Facebook account up to date.

The Facebook team and Mark like to talk about privacy but the default settings are to “no privacy”. Then when Facebook makes a program update they automatically turn off your privacy settings again. Facebooks mission seems to support identity theives and not their customers. Recomendation: Since Facebook doesn’t care then the user has to take responsibilitly. Therefore, lie about everything from your schools, home town, age, sex, etc. Facebook will then become the social media for pathilogical liars.

So how do you like those emails that look like they are comming from a friend only to discuver after opening the attachment it was malware infested spam? All your personal information and online accounts are now in jepordy, or maybe you will become a botnet node for a Denial-of-Service (Dos) attack.